Blake corum nft

NIL and engage with their fans.”

Purchasers of the NFTs will gain access to Draftly’s private college sports community and curated college sports events.

The development is further indicative of increased engagement between the sports space and digitised assets, including NFTs and ‘Fan Tokens’, which are becoming leveraged more and more as a means of driving revenue and improving fan engagement.

Socios.com and Sorare are two platforms which have been enjoying significant success via partnership with sports organisations, particularly in the football scene through agreements with clubs such as Arsenal and Leeds United – two of the more recent adopters of the technology as a fan engagement tool – a trend which began to skyrocket after AC Milan entered the field towards the beginning of this year.

Blake corum nft

For our future NFTs, all of our fans and customers should be able to expect the full Michigan logo, the trademarks. And that’s something our team will work very diligently on over the next several months to make sure it’s live.”

Despite the hiccup, Corum’s collection is indicative of a larger movement by college athletes into the NFT space.
Heisman Trophy winning Alabama quarterback Bryce Young partnered with New York Times best-selling artist Arturo Torres for an NFT project while Shareef O’Neal, the son of NBA legend Shaquille O’Neal, has NFTs listed for as much as $2 million.

Deloitte predicted that the overall sports media NFT market will reach $2 billion in transactions during 2022.

“What I really see is we’re in the early stages, the early days of NIL rules and laws within the United States, within college sports,” DeNuzzo said.

Is that something that you guys have talked to schools about yet, Nick, and how is Draftly approaching that? Do you think maybe eventually you will be able to get that licensing and kind of use the true Michigan jersey on the NFT?

NICK DENUZZO: Yes. That is a fantastic question, and something that we are actually working on right now.
We’ve had various conversations with different rights-holders in the space to make sure that for any future drops for Blake or for Jack or any of our other athletes, we’ll be actually able to use the logos and trademarks directly within our NFTs.

Right now, we are just concerned about getting Blake’s NFTs out before the playoff games that happen on the 31st. But for our future NFTs, all of our fans and customers should be able to expect the full Michigan logo, the trademarks.

That’s been my dream since I was a kid, just football, reaching my goals, going to the next level. So I kind of just really focused on that. But when I had some downtime, maybe Sundays, whatever, I would look at people reaching out, emailing, and what type of deals they wanted.

You can’t jump on everything.
You have to accept things that you like. You can’t do everything for just the money. So the deals that I like, I accept. The deals I don’t really think go with me and what I want, I decline.

But I kind of just focus on the football aspect right now. That’s my main focus. It’s my main purpose.

NICK DENUZZO: Hey, Blake, I’m curious.

When you look at the cost of some of these NFTs, there’s one for you for 25 bucks. So the entry point is easy. Do you own any? Do you have friends who own them?

BLAKE CORUM: Yeah.

In December 2021, Michigan running back Blake Corum launched an NFT collection hoping to cash-in on national exposure amid the College Football Playoff — but the NFT does not have his team’s logo.

Because Corum and the NFT provider, Draftly, didn’t receive clearance from Michigan to use the school’s official marks or uniforms, Corum isn’t pictured in an official Michigan uniform on the NFT. Instead, blue is pasted over the signature blue and yellow striped Michigan helmet, and Corum’s jersey appears more generic.

“We’ve had various conversations with different rights-holders in the space to make sure that for any future drops for Blake or for [Notre Dame quarterback] Jack [Coan] or any of our other athletes, we’ll actually be able to use the logos and trademarks directly within our NFTs,” Draftly CEO Nick DeNuzzo told Yahoo Finance (video above).

Actually, a couple of my friends actually bought a couple of my NFTs that just dropped. They bought a couple. They said they wanted to get in.

And so they got in. But personally, I don’t own any. I’ll probably end up buying a couple. But as I learn more about it, I’m going to get into it more and become an NFT owner.

JOSH SCHAFER: And Nick, one thing.
We have Blake’s NFT up right now. And you could see it that there’s not kind of that flagship Michigan helmet on it. And I think that’s probably, with the licensing with Michigan and some of the schools, that’s something that’s come up in a lot of the NIL deals is kind of the schools allowing you to use their licensing.

Athletes still likely won’t have access to the mark in industries where the university already has brand partners, though.

“We’ve heard from so many different trading companies, or individuals and companies who want to get into trading cards,” Svoboda said. “Well, the University of Michigan already has existing relationships with trading card companies and so we’re not going to necessarily just award a trademark or licensing to a competitor of somebody who’s already a partner. That wouldn’t make a lot of sense for everybody involved.”

Some schools have been more lenient with approvals. Syracuse University allowed basketball player Buddy Boeheim, son of long-time head coach Jim Boeheim, to use the university’s block “S” logo on merchandise in July.

Athletes still likely won’t have access to the mark in industries where the university already has brand partners, though.

“We’ve heard from so many different trading companies, or individuals and companies who want to get into trading cards,” Svoboda said. “Well, the University of Michigan already has existing relationships with trading card companies and so we’re not going to necessarily just award a trademark or licensing to a competitor of somebody who’s already a partner. That wouldn’t make a lot of sense for everybody involved.”

Some schools have been more lenient with approvals.

Syracuse University allowed basketball player Buddy Boeheim, son of long-time head coach Jim Boeheim, to use the university’s block “S” logo on merchandise in July.

Draftly, like you said, is a platform that helps college athletes monetize their name, image, and likeness by producing NFTs, allowing them to make a quick buck, but also building their community of fans and other athletes and coaches and university officials into one consolidated place. And this is an excellent way for college athletes to monetize an image or likeness in a very quick way that does not prevent them or take them away from the field and the game they love.

JOSH SCHAFER: Wait. Can you just break down for us? I don’t know if you knew anything about NFTs before this, or just kind of what was attractive about the NFT part of the opportunity to you?

BLAKE CORUM: Honestly, I didn’t really know too much about it. I heard about it. I believe some NBA players had some NFTs that went for some big bucks.

In addition to being valuable digital collectibles, these NFTs provide exclusive access to a robust and vibrant college sports community. Draftly believes that sports provide a unique opportunity in modern society to unite people in an increasingly divided world and intends to bridge the physical and digital community with this unifying ethos in mind.

Anyone interested in getting early-access to the drop, learning more about NFTs, and connecting with other fellow college sports fans should join the Draftly Discord today.

Discord is a free online voice, video, and chat messaging platform used by millions of people around the globe to connect digitally. The first 300 people to join the Draftly Discord server will receive an exclusive Draftly POAP for free. POAPs are unique NFT badges given out to attendees of both virtual and real-world events.

And that’s something our team will work very diligently on over the next several months to make sure it’s live.

– Nick, I’ll give you the last word here. I’m wondering, with this partnership with college athletes– I know you also work with high school athletes as well with the NFT creation process– where do you see these kinds of partnerships going in the future?

NICK DENUZZO: Yeah, it’s a fantastic question. So what I really see is we’re in the early stages, the early days of NIL rules and laws within the United States, within college sports. And we’re also in the early days of NFTs right now. We all saw the massive NFT wave that started last March, the NFT summer that happened where JPEGs were going for absurd valuations.

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